Tag Archives: Historical romance

Cameo Portrait: Enticing Benedict Cole

CAMEO newsletter

An artist, a lady, a secret passion… 

When Benedict Cole shuns her request for painting lessons, Lady “Cameo” Catherine Mary St. Clair takes matters into her own hands. She arrives at Benedict’s studio, only to be mistaken for a model! It’s an opportunity she just can’t turn down…

Benedict knows better than to let intimacy interfere with his work, yet he can’t quell his fascination for the mysterious Cameo. And after one daring night together, everything changes. Will Cameo still be his muse when Benedict discovers who she really is?’

The heroine of Enticing Benedict Cole is Cameo. It really is a girl’s name. A cameo is a small carving in relief of a semi-precious stone. The lighter-coloured layer is chipped away to reveal a darker background. In the 19th century, when this story is set, cameo jewellery was popularised by Queen Victoria. At that time small cameo portraits were often painted of well-to-do young women to adorn jewellery, for a keepsake, or to give to a lover. The word cameo has an original Greek meaning of ‘shadow portrait’ – which became part of the story.

Enticing Benedict Cole cover

I collected quite a few cameos while writing the book, as you’ll see on my ‘Cameo Appearance’ Pinterest board. Any excuse will do – right?

Visit Eliza Redgold at Harlequin Mills and Boon for a free extract of Enticing Benedict Cole.

Best wishes,

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Lady Godiva’s Ride into New York

Eliza Redgold at the Flatiron Building New York

Eliza Redgold (Dr Elizabeth Reid Boyd) at the Flatiron Building New York

 

Of late I’ve been writing about Lady Godiva’s ride back into popular culture. I’m so excited to have the chance to present on NAKED at the Popular/American Culture Association in the US in 2015. Here’s the abstract for my academic paper:

‘The legend of Lady Godiva, who famously rode naked through the streets of Coventry covered only by her long, flowing hair, has lasted for centuries. Her tale has been revived and romanticized time and time again, especially during periods of change and liberation in women’s lives. This is one such time. Drawing upon the recently published NAKED: A Novel of Lady Godiva (St Martin’s Press) written by Eliza Redgold (the pseudonym of Dr Elizabeth Reid Boyd) this paper explores the stories surrounding Godiva. It reveals her history, her myth and how far back in time her legend goes, to Christian saints and pagan goddesses. Whether fact or fiction, Godiva of Coventry was a unique woman and a heroine in more ways than one: as sexual symbol, spiritual icon and political activist. In a single leap, she jumps the hurdle of the double-standard that divided women into saints or sinners. Her return to popular culture today heralds a new kind of (post)feminist freedom. Her courage continues to inspire, her tale to be told, even after a thousand years.  Godiva is more than a naked lady. She is an evocation of the divine.’

My paper will be accompanied by a slide show of images of Godiva through time. If you’d like to share some of these images, you can check them out at my guest post (thanks so much!) at A Bookish Affair or on my Lady Godiva Pinterest board.

I’ll also be in New York and will have a chance to thank the wonderful people at St Martin’s Press in the Flatiron Building who made publishing Godiva so magical.

naked

best wishes,

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A Grace for Books: Mindful Reading

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Why have we no grace for books, those spiritual repasts – a grace before Milton – a grace before Shakespeare – a devotional exercise proper to be said before reading the Faeire Queen?‘ ~ Charles Lamb

Of late I’ve been thinking about how we read. It has changed so much in the last decade, with e-books and reading on line. We still read (maybe even more than before) but we read differently (though many noblewomen in the past read romance and books on spirituality and self-development just like we do today!)

Historically, noblewomen used Books of Hours, beautiful books of prayers, to mark their time. Richly illuminated with pictures of saints, Bible stories, and even signs of the Zodiac, they were sometimes encrusted with jewels. Some called girdle books were small enough to be hung from the waist. Books of Hours contained a calendar, gospel lessons, psalms and special prayers to be said at certain hours of the day: Prime (6am, or upon waking) Terce (9am) Sext (midday) None (3pm) Vespers (6pm) and Compline (9pm, or upon retiring).

The illustration above is taken from a fifteenth century Book of Hours. She is Virgo (my star sign).  I’m going to try the custom of marking my time with a Book of Hours by doing some daily devotional reading.

If you want to join me, here’s how:

Select your own Book of Hours: a prayer book, a hymnal, a spiritual text, a day book, or even a book of poetry. From this book, choose a short quotation, text or excerpt to use as a daily devotional reading (it only needs to be a few lines long). Or you can simply open your chosen book by chance and read the first section you see. Read your quotation in the morning and again at night. Try this for about a month for the most benefit. If you skip a day, just go back to it the next.

Alternatively, try the traditional marking of hours, reading a short text or quotation from your chosen Book of Hours, on the hour, every hour, for a whole day. (We check our phones that often, so why not try this instead!) It might sound arduous, but is found to be relaxing. Build this into a regular practice, or use it as a meditative technique to slow you down when you are feeling particularly rushed or overwhelmed.

Marking time with a devotional reading only takes a moment as the clock strikes, but it creates an entirely different sense of time and increases our mindfulness. Our days will feel very different when we mark the golden hours.

Wishing you blessed reading,

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In Love with the Pre-Raphaelites

'Marigolds' or The Gardener's Daughter Rosetti

‘Marigolds’ or The Gardener’s Daughter by Dante Gabriel Rosetti was an inspiration for my Harlequin Historical romance ‘Enticing Benedict Cole’.

The beautiful, romantic Pre-Raphaelite paintings are some of the most familiar artworks in the world. During the 19th century, the art and love lives of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, a group of brilliant, free thinking young men, were considered scandalous. Their artistic milieu was in complete contrast with the strict conventions of the Victorian upper classes who lived in a controlled, stifling world, and they were often trapped and unhappy. It would have been considered unthinkable for an aristocratic young lady to want to pursue art seriously, and even more unthinkable to be an artist’s model. That’s the dream of Lady Cameo St Clair, the heroine of my Victorian romance Enticing Benedict Cole. Her story celebrates every woman who ever challenged convention for the sake of art, and for the sake of love. It is published by Harlequin Historical.

Another Lady who is capturing the imagination of readers is Lady Godiva! THANK YOU to all the readers who have read and reviewed Naked: A Novel of Lady Godiva.  Her story deserved to be written – and I’m so glad it is being read!

Collier

The famous image used for the cover of NAKED: A Novel of Lady Godiva was painted by John Collier in the Pre-Raphaelite style (1898).

If you’d enjoy more Pre-Raphaelite Beauty visit my Pinterest page

Best wishes,

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Eliza Redgold Romances

UK Cover Enticing Benedict Cole

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Wild Horses

wooden horsesOf late I’ve been writing about wild rides. 2014 was the Chinese Year of the Horse and it certainly was for me! Perhaps it was auspicious I happened to be in Singapore to celebrate Chinese New Year. I saw these amazing wooden horses at Garden by the Bay in Singapore.

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In 2014 I learned to horse-ride. I’d love to report that I became a brilliant horsewoman overnight, like my heroine Godiva, but I got worse instead of better. I learned at an extraordinary therapeutic riding center that has lessons for young and old, able-bodied and disabled riders alike. Some of the people I met were absolutely inspiring. I learned some life lessons – not just riding lessons.

In the nakedYear of the Horse NAKED: A Novel of Lady Godiva (she of the famous naked ride) was accepted by St Martin’s Press, New York and will be released this July. The year of the horse was magic for me – I hope it was for you too!

Here’s Wild Horses a song I listened to while writing Godiva’s story.

I wonder what 2015, the Chinese Year of the (Green Wood) Sheep will bring? Wishing you every joy and the best of luck,

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 desk charmsMy desk charms –  Good luck to you!